Japanese Culture – Japon Online http://japononline.net/ Fri, 11 Jun 2021 10:47:46 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.7.2 https://japononline.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default1-150x150.png Japanese Culture – Japon Online http://japononline.net/ 32 32 Japanese city uses lessons from tsunami for Covid vaccinations https://japononline.net/japanese-city-uses-lessons-from-tsunami-for-covid-vaccinations/ https://japononline.net/japanese-city-uses-lessons-from-tsunami-for-covid-vaccinations/#respond Fri, 11 Jun 2021 09:24:12 +0000 https://japononline.net/japanese-city-uses-lessons-from-tsunami-for-covid-vaccinations/ Tamio Hayashi, 77, doubted he could ever navigate the internet systems set up to register for Covid-19 vaccines in most of Japan. He hated the idea of ​​using the “troublesome” systems that broke down and confused other older residents, hampering Japan’s inoculation campaign. Luckily, local officials in his small northeastern town helped him through the […]]]>


Tamio Hayashi, 77, doubted he could ever navigate the internet systems set up to register for Covid-19 vaccines in most of Japan.

He hated the idea of ​​using the “troublesome” systems that broke down and confused other older residents, hampering Japan’s inoculation campaign.

Luckily, local officials in his small northeastern town helped him through the red tape and he got his vaccines – a rarity in Japan, where authorities are rushing to vaccinate the vulnerable elderly population before the Games start. Summer Olympics in just six weeks.

“It’s great that way,” Hayashi told Reuters after he and his wife received their second dose at a local gym. “You have just received a notice that says to come on such and such a day. “

Soma, a rural town 240 kilometers (150 miles) north of Tokyo that was devastated by the 2011 earthquake and tsunami, has led most of the country in immunization taking into account lessons learned from the disaster. ten years ago.

Japan lags far behind other advanced economies in vaccinating its population – 12% received at least one injection, according to a Reuters tracker, compared to France, the second largest industrial power in the Group of Seven at 42% , and the most advanced, Canada, at 63 percent.

Soma’s agile and local approach avoids reservation systems and fragmented efforts common across Japan. The city has vaccinated 84% of its seniors – up from around 28% nationally – is now injecting the younger generations and aims to reach people as young as 16 by the end of July, just around the time the Olympics begin.

Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga wants the elderly population of Japan to be fully vaccinated by July and all adults by November. But that will require increasing the number of shots to one million per day from the peak of around 700,000 so far.

Part of Soma’s success is due to its small population of 35,000, which makes it easier to reach residents of the Pacific Coast city of Fukushima Prefecture than overburdened medical staff in giant urban areas.

But the city is also succeeding where much of Japan has failed because of the painful lessons of the tsunami that killed 450 city residents as it swept 4 kilometers (2.5 miles) into the interior. land.

This disaster has taught Soma the importance of making and communicating clear plans, working closely with local health professionals, bringing those affected together in concentrated locations – and not waiting for one. plan come from Tokyo – said Deputy Mayor Katsuhiro Abe.

“I don’t know if you would say we couldn’t have done this without the earthquake,” Abe said. “But this immunization program comes in conjunction with the experience of the city government and the people who have come together to deal with it over these 10 years.”

Japan has avoided the huge number of Covid-19 cases and death toll seen in many countries, but the start of its vaccine rollout in mid-February was later than most and was initially hampered by the scarcity of stocks of imported vaccines.

The distribution was then uneven, while the reservation systems broke down or confused the elderly people prioritized for the shots.

Soma leaders and doctors, building on the lessons of 2011, began drafting plans and holding immunization exercises in December, months before the vaccines were approved.

The city has set up a central vaccination center, retaining medical staff. Residents were called by block, no reservations needed, and the city sent buses for those who couldn’t travel on their own.

After the previous disaster, Soma’s neighbors know they have to look out for each other, while city officials are used to moving from clerical work to crisis management, said resident Abe. longtime Soma.

City dwellers are quickly transported to waiting areas and screenings, then to a partitioned area for their shots.

When some older patients got annoyed when asked to turn left or right for their injections, staff improvised with cartoon posters on the walls: Face the rabbit for an injection in your right arm , turn to the dog to get it in the left arm.

“The strategy must be adapted to each local culture and context,” said Kenji Shibuya, who resigned this spring as director of the Institute for Population Health at King’s College London to help lead the vaccination campaign. Soma against Covid-19.

“It’s a war,” said Mr. Shibuya, a persistent critic of Japan’s handling of the pandemic.

He said the best thing the government can do is provide a constant supply of vaccines and supplies to municipalities – and leave the rest to the people on the ground.

Reuters



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Social media energizes the export of American political culture https://japononline.net/social-media-energizes-the-export-of-american-political-culture/ https://japononline.net/social-media-energizes-the-export-of-american-political-culture/#respond Thu, 10 Jun 2021 16:17:41 +0000 https://japononline.net/social-media-energizes-the-export-of-american-political-culture/ June 12, 2021 BOSTON AND SÃO PAULO ARTHUR DO VAL just wanted to be someone. Acting legislator at the São Paulo regional assembly – with, as he boasts in his Twitter biography, the second highest number of votes of all the candidates – Mr do Val rose to fame by heckling left-handers on marches . […]]]>


ARTHUR DO VAL just wanted to be someone. Acting legislator at the São Paulo regional assembly – with, as he boasts in his Twitter biography, the second highest number of votes of all the candidates – Mr do Val rose to fame by heckling left-handers on marches . He learned this tactic, he explains, from documentaries by Michael Moore, an American political filmmaker.

Mr. do Val has since grown into a talented and prolific producer of user-friendly content for the web. His team posts hundreds of images and video clips on social media every week. People want to be entertained, he argues, so politics should be fun too. Political arguments should be presented in funny memes and silly videos which, in Mr. do Val’s case, tend to focus on promoting economically liberal ideas and denigrating the left.

“I tried to be a rock star; I failed. I tried to be a fighter, an athlete; I failed. I was just a frustrated businessman. Then I saw on YouTube an opportunity to exploit my outrage, “he explains.” I just wanted to stand out, and by accident it got me into a political career. “

Mr. do Val’s rise from person-to-person to state deputy at the age of 32 was both improbable and impressive. But he embodies a new transnational class of political entrepreneurs who communicate through memes, videos and slogans. They tap into a global flow of ideas, adapt them to local conditions and send them back to the ether. Many are activists or ordinary people. Social media is their most important means of influence, both on their followers and on each other. The result is not only a new class of unorthodox politicians, but also the globalization of political ideas, many of which come from America.

American movies, television and music are loved everywhere. Its consumer brands are globally beaten. Its social media stars have global influence. As the most powerful country in the world, with enormous cultural reach, it has always had a huge impact on political trends and movements.

In 1990, Joseph Nye, a political scientist at Harvard, introduced the concept of “soft power,” which he defined as “the ability to affect others and achieve preferred results through attraction and persuasion rather than coercion or payment “. Hollywood, pop music, McDonald’s and Levi’s jeans are all expressions of American soft power.

For many people beyond its shores, consuming these goods was as close as possible to sharing the American dream. When the first McDonald’s opened in Mumbai in 1996, Indians lined up by the thousands to sample its legendary burger (albeit made without beef), replicating a scene from Moscow six years earlier. (The opening of a Starbucks in Mumbai ten years ago sparked a similar reaction.) Mumbai’s film industry, the world’s largest, is called “Bollywood” to emulate its Los Angeles counterpart. Nigeria has “Nollywood”, Pakistan “Lollywood”.

Even though McDonald’s and Hollywood contribute to growing obesity and unrealistic forensic expectations, for policymakers the important thing is that, as Mr. Nye puts it, “attracting others often gets you. what you want “. A fondness for American brands is positively correlated with a favorable opinion of the US government. What has changed is that the culture the country exports has broadened to encompass its politics. And in the age of social media, memes, not McDonald’s, are the primary vehicle for American cultural influence.

Take Brazil. Its political scene is teeming with YouTubers and Facebook influencers. These include supporters of Jair Bolsonaro, the president; government critics like Felipe Neto, who rose to prominence by making videos for young people; and a large market of political content creators in between. “There is a lot of influence, even unconscious, of the [American] speech. What happens there comes here, ”says Mr. do Val, citing debates about face masks or race. It’s not as easy as copying and pasting American arguments, he warns. On the contrary, America provides the models that anyone, anywhere, can apply.

According to Whitney Phillips, a media researcher at Syracuse University in New York City, America’s role in shaping political debates does not come only from the standards it promotes. It also “stems from its cultural production – the real stuff of media and memes,” she writes in “You Are Here,” a new book examining global information flows. One of the reasons America’s influence is greater now, she says, is that “social media is global. And there are a lot more people outside of the United States who use Facebook than in the United States.

Black Lives Matter Sweeps Nigeria

Consider the issue of black lives (BLM) protests that erupted in America in 2020. They have inspired local versions everywhere, from South Korea, where there are very few people of African descent, to Nigeria, where there are very few people who are not. In Britain, where police usually do not carry firearms, a protester held up a sign saying “Demilitarize the police”. In Hungary, where Africans represent less than 0.1% of the population, a town hall attempted to install a work of art in support of the BLM movement, only to win a reprimand from the prime minister’s office. Last year, the Hungarian government released a video stating: “All lives matter”.

QAnon, a conspiracy theory that pedophile cannibals rule America, began circulating in 2017. It has since gained a lot of followers outside of the United States. At a small QAnon protest in London last year, people carried signs that read ‘Stop protecting pedophiles’. In France, it is based on yellow vests (yellow vest) demonstrators. According to one estimate, Germany has the second highest number of QAnon followers in the world. The conspiracy theory has even spread to Japan, despite the country’s radically different political culture.

Cultural influence is not a one-way street. British political influencers enjoy a large following, including in America. The strange Canadian takes a look. Mr. do Val proudly refers to the “Confused Lady” meme as the one that started in Brazil but is now widely distributed abroad. Yet few people know of his Brazilian origins. Brazilian movements – or any other – also don’t inspire similar memes around the world. The ability to influence the world, even indirectly, is proportional to the cultural weight of a country (see graph).

A big part of that is the work of social media. It amplifies new voices, accelerates the speed at which ideas spread, and expands the scale at which people and ideas can gain influence. But established newspapers and TV stations also retain immense influence, even online. CNN is the second most visited English language news site in the world, after the BBC. the New York Times is third. In November, Emmanuel Macron, the French president, complained to the newspaper about his coverage of a terrorist attack near Paris. Mr. Macron is not contacting all media about his coverage. But some 50 million people outside the United States, in every country on Earth, read the New York Times online. Of its 5.2 million digital subscribers, nearly a fifth are outside the United States.

The media elsewhere are inspired by their American counterparts. According to the analysis of Kings College London (KCL), mentions of “culture wars” in the British press were once a quadrennial phenomenon, suggesting that they were occurring at the same time as the US presidential elections. But in recent years, the use of the term has exploded. “We imported the language of cultural wars into the UK basically, ”says Bobby Duffy, director of KCLInstitute of Politics.

Together, these factors help explain why QAnon gained worldwide fame, lockdown skepticism adopted American vocabulary, and BLM the protests have spread across the world. Just as people all over the world watch Hollywood movies, they also follow US newspapers, TV shows, and social media.

The same cannot be said of any other country. Take China. The protests in Hong Kong have generated sympathy and solidarity, but have not inspired similar protests. Not many people outside of China are enthusiastic about buying Huawei phones or shopping on Alibaba. TikTok, its only globally successful internet product, is split into a Chinese version – Douyin – and the version used elsewhere. The Great Chinese Firewall keeps the rest of the world out, but it also keeps Chinese ideas out.

In addition, the openness of American politics allows for easy appropriation of its symbols and iconography, explains Craig Hayden, professor of strategic studies at Marine Corps University in Virginia. Videos of riots in American streets are ostensibly expected to hurt the country’s standing in the world. Instead, people in other countries see unrest in Washington or Minneapolis and think America is “engaged in this kind of struggle that parallels ours,” he says. And America’s ambitious cachet makes its movements all the more powerful. “I can think of a random country somewhere that has internal racial conflicts; we don’t all retweet what’s going on there, ”he adds.

Uncle Sam’s digital megaphone

Just as political power in the age of social media has caved in to disruptors, so has the power to influence affairs in faraway lands. Social media users in Minneapolis or Seattle can impact São Paulo Instagrammers. Arguments that start on New England college campuses migrate to Old England lounges. The Internet promised to help information circulate around the world. But social networks and their algorithms have just amplified America’s voice.

This article appeared in the international section of the print edition under the title “What is Japanese for QAnon?” “



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Great Ace Attorney Had a Long, Hard Road to North America https://japononline.net/great-ace-attorney-had-a-long-hard-road-to-north-america/ https://japononline.net/great-ace-attorney-had-a-long-hard-road-to-north-america/#respond Wed, 09 Jun 2021 18:58:17 +0000 https://japononline.net/great-ace-attorney-had-a-long-hard-road-to-north-america/ The Great Ace Attorney has had a long and complicated road to the Western Shores. Originally released in Japan in 2015, the 19th-century spin-off of the Ace Attorney franchise presented a huge localization challenge, given its heavy reliance on Japanese culture during the Meiji era. In one in-depth interview with PolygonCapcom’s director of localization, Janet […]]]>


The Great Ace Attorney has had a long and complicated road to the Western Shores. Originally released in Japan in 2015, the 19th-century spin-off of the Ace Attorney franchise presented a huge localization challenge, given its heavy reliance on Japanese culture during the Meiji era.

In one in-depth interview with PolygonCapcom’s director of localization, Janet Hsu, detailed the many obstacles she and the other members of the localization team had to overcome to get The Great Ace Attorney into American hands.

For Hsu, one of the biggest localization challenges has become somewhat obvious.

“Back when I was working on the Japanese version of the second title, The Great Ace Attorney 2: Resolve, I had a dream of localizing the duology to Victorian British English, because I wanted the game to sound like something from that era. “, Hsu told Polygon.

“To this end, I had collected a number of dictionaries from the late 19th century, namely the OED from 1888 and another Oxford dictionary from 1912. Perhaps it was more of a hindrance than I created. for myself. However, Japanese is written in a sort of “faux-Meiji Era” style, so I thought it my duty to at least bring an equally “faux-Victorian” flavor to the English localization.

Sticking to words that existed exclusively in 19th-century Japan or England proved difficult, with Hsu citing “backstab” as an example of a word that had not yet been added to any Victorian dictionary.

Cultural attachments are also taken into account. Japanese real-life author Soseki Natsume is included as a character in The Great Ace Attorney, and although he is well known to Japanese audiences (he is often required reading for students and was once featured on the 1,000 yen), the American public obviously wouldn’t.

“Authentic, yet accessible” was my mantra during this project, and it was sometimes very difficult to stick to it, ”Hsu said. “However, that was also a big part of how I kept the text on track. Translating things too authentically can sometimes make the text inaccessible in some cases. This applies not only to Japanese cultural elements, but also to things like the use of more obscure Victorian-era words or even die-hard Britishisms which, while genuine, would have been completely confusing to people. unfamiliar with these words and expressions. So while we stuck to the natural writing of the dialogues in British English, we never did it in a way that could block a player or make a puzzle unsolvable due to cultural or grammatical misunderstanding.

Screenshots of The Great Ace Attorney Chronicles

Other challenges included aligning character animations with English dialogue, as a Japanese speaker can communicate something faster or slower depending on the words used. Hsu also encountered the problem of having to record English voiceover actors during the COVID-19 pandemic. Something that a lot of the games industry and the animation industry has faced this past year.

The Great Ace Attorney Chronicles, a collection of the 2015 original and the 2017 sequel, will release July 27, 2021 for PS4, Switch, and PC via Steam. The game stars Phoenix Wright’s ancestor Ryunosuke Naruhodo as he works to exonerate victims in court alongside investigator Herlock Sholmes (yes) and Iris Wilson.

Joseph Knoop is a writer / producer / detective for IGN.



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Healing Words: Taiwan’s Tribes Fight To Save Their Endangered Languages ​​| Taiwan https://japononline.net/healing-words-taiwans-tribes-fight-to-save-their-endangered-languages-%e2%80%8b%e2%80%8b-taiwan/ https://japononline.net/healing-words-taiwans-tribes-fight-to-save-their-endangered-languages-%e2%80%8b%e2%80%8b-taiwan/#respond Tue, 08 Jun 2021 23:54:00 +0000 https://japononline.net/healing-words-taiwans-tribes-fight-to-save-their-endangered-languages-%e2%80%8b%e2%80%8b-taiwan/ IIn a modest conference room near the edge of Taiwan’s Sun Moon Lake, Panu Kapamumu holds a bulky A3 booklet. The document printed at home contains all the known words of Thao, the language of his native tribe. Kapamumu flips through the list, reading a selection of Thao words, meanings and translations. He reads slowly […]]]>


IIn a modest conference room near the edge of Taiwan’s Sun Moon Lake, Panu Kapamumu holds a bulky A3 booklet. The document printed at home contains all the known words of Thao, the language of his native tribe. Kapamumu flips through the list, reading a selection of Thao words, meanings and translations. He reads slowly and with determination, a man in his sixties but still only a student of his mother tongue.

Panu Kapamumu reads Thao. Photography: Helen Davidson

Pastay piakolinkin piakaimahan. Ito Thao Panu Kapamumu, “he says. It translates into English as,” Everyone is safe and doing well. I am from the Thao people, Panu Kapamumu.

Normally, Kapamumu speaks a mixture of the two languages ​​he knows better than his own – Chinese and English.

“We believe in the spirits of our ancestors, so we cherish our own language and consider it more important than our own life… We have the right to survive,” he says.

The indigenous tribes of Taiwan are in a race against time to save their languages ​​before they are lost forever. It is estimated that 35% of Taiwan’s 400,000 indigenous people speak their mother tongue fluently, but in some communities it is much less.

The government of Taiwan officially recognizes 16 tribes that inhabited the island for millennia before the arrival of the Han people. The Thao, whose traditional lands surround Sun Moon Lake, are the smallest, with fewer than 800 members. Thao is a member of the Austronesian language family, which is spoken throughout Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, and much of the Pacific. It is one of four of Taiwan’s 16 languages ​​considered by Unesco to be critically endangered.

Under the authoritarian and assimilationist regime of Japan, and then under the nationalist Kuomintang (KMT) regime, indigenous languages ​​were criminalized. The Thao’s losses spilled over to the land, lives and culture.

“With the Japanese, you can’t speak your language. The KMT, you don’t speak your language, there were punishments in the schools. Our language therefore stopped 75 years ago, ”he says.

A loss of language is a loss of traditional and cultural practices, explains Dremedreman a lja Tjuveleljem, a consultant and professional teacher of her language, Paiwan.

“Traditional knowledge has always been transmitted through the mother tongue,” explains Tjuveleljem. The loss is most pronounced in urban communities, where people have been displaced by force, natural disaster or the economy, she said.

Kapamumu, president of the Thao Cultural Development Association, estimates that their efforts have recorded about 90% of the Thao language. There are now five dedicated language teachers in Taiwan, but this is an informal community effort, with minimal resources – a scenario that unfolds across the island.

“Pride and purpose”

The government of Taiwan seeks to address the oppression of the island’s indigenous peoples, especially the loss of the language, and in 2016, President Tsai Ing-wen apologized for the “centuries of pain and ill-treatment ”.

In 2017, parliament passed a law to promote and preserve indigenous languages. It designated Taiwan’s 16 national languages, fivefolding the language budget of the Council of Indigenous Peoples (IPC) and banning further indigenous consultation in policy making, establishment of a foundation for language research and development. and the provision of language courses. in schools and colleges (which the activists demanded compulsory for native high school students). Since last week there are now three languages included as options on Wikipedia.

Ting-chung Chen, assistant professor of linguistics at Tsing Hua National University, says the government has good intentions but the foundation, who is responsible for language preservation and educational measures, was understaffed and unable to meet the needs of the 42 dialects in the 16 languages.

“A lot of communities are trying to create their own textbooks… but they don’t really know how to do it. Teachers are not trained as teachers, ”she said, adding that greater linguistic expertise was needed to ensure quality and consultation with communities.

Responding to concerns, Sayun Tosu, director of international affairs at IPC, said the council has developed educational materials for all levels of learning and e-learning for distant students like herself, a Tayal woman living in an urban area. He also cooperated with elders, schools and local organizations to develop dictionaries and lessons.

“Languages ​​that were once considered dialects and prohibited for use in schools now have a legal basis as national languages,” says Tosu.

“Language preservation has a higher priority in promoting IPC policies because it is at the heart of our culture. “

Tjuveleljem argues that community-level projects risked “developing a system of romanization which cannot be understood outside their immediate circle”, and required external expertise.

More and more native speakers are being accelerated as teachers themselves, amid growing acceptance of indigenous language teaching as a profession.

“There was a fairly recent time when it would have been considered fanciful to make a living from government by teaching the mother tongue, but now there are a significant number that do,” she said.

Sun Moon Lake in Taiwan
Lake of the Sun and the Moon in Taiwan. Photography: AP

Communities should focus on speaking their language regularly, especially with children, she says.

“There are all the challenges of government funding and time spent in school, etc., but if the indigenous peoples themselves cannot carry this flag, it becomes even more difficult. “

The benefits of indigenous communities retaining their language are well documented abroad. In Australia, which shares indigenous historical similarities, efforts to save languages ​​have been linked to improved mental health, social outcomes, and land stewardship.

There appears to be less literature on the impact in Taiwan, but a study of an Atayal elementary school’s first language immersive program in 2017 found that it “greatly enriched” the enthusiasm and academic performance of the pupil. The school’s average math score has become significantly higher than the national average, and Chinese scores have also increased.

Chen said his experience working with dozens of language consultants has seen him see a growing enthusiasm for language revitalization and education.

Panu Kapamumu watches from a bridge in Nantou.
Panu Kapamumu watches from a bridge in Nantou. Photography: Helen Davidson

“Most of them weren’t teachers in the beginning – they were housewives or farmers or truck drivers, which is typical because those with a better education tend not to speak. their traditional language. They are the ones who remained in their tribe and now they are wanted by the government and the schools. It gives them a sense of pride and determination. “

In Nantou, Kapamumu is planning a language camp in the summer. Consciously posing for photos, he looks across the lake and points to the horizon. “I look to the future of our young people,” he jokes.

But it is clear that the question is heavy. They have little time.

“It’s our right to learn our culture and our language, and no one can take it, but we need friends to help us,” he says. “We have no land and we have a difficult life. But if we learn our language, we will be the happiest tribe ”.



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Prime Minister of Tasmania – Tasmania appoints its first trade advisor to Japan https://japononline.net/prime-minister-of-tasmania-tasmania-appoints-its-first-trade-advisor-to-japan/ https://japononline.net/prime-minister-of-tasmania-tasmania-appoints-its-first-trade-advisor-to-japan/#respond Tue, 08 Jun 2021 02:03:14 +0000 https://japononline.net/prime-minister-of-tasmania-tasmania-appoints-its-first-trade-advisor-to-japan/ June 8, 2021 Guy Barnet, Guy Barnett, Minister of Commerce, The Tasmanian Liberal Government is in the process of developing and diversifying new and existing global markets and today we deliver with the appointment of the first-ever Tasmanian Trade Advocate based in Japan. Mr. Joe Gayton has spent over 20 years living and working in […]]]>


June 8, 2021

Guy Barnet,

Guy Barnett, Minister of Commerce,

The Tasmanian Liberal Government is in the process of developing and diversifying new and existing global markets and today we deliver with the appointment of the first-ever Tasmanian Trade Advocate based in Japan.

Mr. Joe Gayton has spent over 20 years living and working in Japan and his appointment is the strongest signal to date of the importance Tasmania places on its relationship with Japan and the opportunities we can share. in the future.

Japan is a priority market in Tasmania’s business strategy. In 2020, Tasmania’s merchandise exports to Japan amounted to $ 239 million per year, accounting for about 6.6% of our total merchandise exports and 22% of our total agricultural and fruit exports. sea.

We also see exciting opportunities in resources, education, the gateway to Antarctica and also green hydrogen, which is destined to be the renewable fuel of the future.

Tasmania values ​​its long history with Japan, which includes a rich trade and investment relationship, supported by strong cultural and people-to-people relationships.

Mr. Gayton has participated in an extensive tendering process and his success is a testament to his long experience and knowledge of trade and international relations in Japan.

Mr. Gayton is a permanent resident of Japan and is fluent in Japanese and English, and Tasmania should benefit from his knowledge, insight and extensive networks that include government and business relations across Japan.

Our international trade advocacy will be further strengthened over the coming months with the recent appointment of a dedicated US trade advocate for Tasmania and an upcoming one in Singapore.

The appointment of the new Tasmanian Trade Advisors is an important part of Tasmania’s 2019-2025 business strategy and a commitment made in the 2021 Annual Action Plan. These new roles will continue to support Tasmania’s ambition of increase its presence in the international market and build even more resilience through increased market diversification.

Today’s announcement follows recent ABS commodity figures which showed Tasmania’s agricultural value increased by 14.7% in 2019-20 from the previous year, at a time when the national growth was only 0.4%.

The Liberal government of Tasmania aims to increase the value of Tasmanian commercial production and develop further market diversification is part of this plan.

More Guy Barnett press releases



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Taito announces the release of the Egret II mini console with rotating screen in Japan https://japononline.net/taito-announces-the-release-of-the-egret-ii-mini-console-with-rotating-screen-in-japan/ https://japononline.net/taito-announces-the-release-of-the-egret-ii-mini-console-with-rotating-screen-in-japan/#respond Mon, 07 Jun 2021 05:05:13 +0000 https://japononline.net/taito-announces-the-release-of-the-egret-ii-mini-console-with-rotating-screen-in-japan/ japanese company Taito Corporation recently announced his new Egret II mini console, which should fall Japan at March 2, 2022. The console will feature a five-inch 4: 3 LCD display that allows users to switch the orientation from horizontal to vertical according to their personal preferences and playing style. The aspect ratio is also a […]]]>


japanese company Taito Corporation recently announced his new Egret II mini console, which should fall Japan at March 2, 2022.

The console will feature a five-inch 4: 3 LCD display that allows users to switch the orientation from horizontal to vertical according to their personal preferences and playing style. The aspect ratio is also a welcome nod to the past, where 4: 3 served as a convention for arcade games.

The main controls of the Egret II Mini include six buttons and an arcade-style stick that goes in four to eight directions. In addition, there is also an optional expansion controller that includes a paddle entry for games and a trackball. A USB cable, HDMI cable, instruction panel and user manual have all been included in the package.

Measuring 240 x 100 x 48mm, the controller looks like a traditional gamepad and comes with an optional additional arcade stick.

The console will include 40 games released between 1978 and the 1990s at launch, as well as 10 additional titles at an additional cost. The full list of titles is as follows –

  • Space invaders
  • Lunar rescue
  • QIX
  • Elevator action
  • Chak’n Pop
  • Bubble Bobble
  • Rastan Saga
  • Additional Rainbow Island
  • New Zealand history
  • Don Doko Don
  • Fight against violence
  • Cadash
  • Kids Liquid
  • Black Metal
  • Kaiser knuckle
  • Strike bowling pins
  • Arkanoid
  • Plump pop
  • Syvalion
  • Camel
  • Arkanoid Returns

The Egret II Mini is currently available for Pre-order at the retail price of 18.678.


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YouTubers Logan Paul and Sam Pepper appear to be lassoing women on video https://japononline.net/youtubers-logan-paul-and-sam-pepper-appear-to-be-lassoing-women-on-video/ https://japononline.net/youtubers-logan-paul-and-sam-pepper-appear-to-be-lassoing-women-on-video/#respond Sun, 06 Jun 2021 02:24:00 +0000 https://japononline.net/youtubers-logan-paul-and-sam-pepper-appear-to-be-lassoing-women-on-video/ An old video showing YouTube personality Logan Paul lassoing unsuspecting women in Los Angeles resurfaced a day before the social media influencer was due to face former boxing world champion Floyd Mayweather in the ring. The video, first posted in 2014 and made private since, appears to show Paul and former YouTuber Sam Pepper using […]]]>


An old video showing YouTube personality Logan Paul lassoing unsuspecting women in Los Angeles resurfaced a day before the social media influencer was due to face former boxing world champion Floyd Mayweather in the ring.

The video, first posted in 2014 and made private since, appears to show Paul and former YouTuber Sam Pepper using a rope to lasso women in Santa Monica. It was shared on Saturday via Twitter by an account called MeTube, which describes itself as the “YouTube #MeToo Untold Stories”.

“We do something where we pick up women with lassos,” Paul says to a woman, who appears to be smiling and laughing.

Paul later tells a blonde woman that he won’t let her go until she kisses him. She obliges and the two lock their lips for several seconds.

Other people in the video seemed less amused by Paul and Pepper’s advances. A woman hits and kicks Paul while Pepper is attacked by several men who are trying to protect a woman in their group.

Neither Paul nor Pepper immediately responded to requests for comment.

Pepper, a former “Big Brother” competitor from England, was later accused of rape by several women in the same year the lassoing video was published, Buzzfeed reported in 2014. Pepper has denied the allegations and has never been charged. He quit posting on YouTube in 2017 and has since made a professional comeback on TikTok.

Paul, a YouTube star with nearly 23 million subscribers, began his career on the now-defunct six-second video app Vine, and after Vine was shut down he moved to YouTube, where he continued to develop. its audience. Recently, Paul has started to focus on a boxing career.

Last year, Paul was sued by a production company which claimed that a 2017 video he posted of a corpse in a Japanese “suicide forest” caused him to lose a multi-million license agreement. dollars with Google.

The now infamous video shows Paul and a group of friends visiting Aokigahara at the foot of Mount Fuji, nicknamed the “Suicide Forest” because of the large number of people who go there to end their lives there. . The video has been viewed 6 million times in one day and shows the body of a man who appears to have committed suicide. Paul then apologized in a video posted to social media and said he would work to “do better.”

Suzanne Ciechalski contributed.





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The Olympics gave hope to LGBTQ activists in Japan. But old prejudices die hard. https://japononline.net/the-olympics-gave-hope-to-lgbtq-activists-in-japan-but-old-prejudices-die-hard/ https://japononline.net/the-olympics-gave-hope-to-lgbtq-activists-in-japan-but-old-prejudices-die-hard/#respond Sat, 05 Jun 2021 11:59:53 +0000 https://japononline.net/the-olympics-gave-hope-to-lgbtq-activists-in-japan-but-old-prejudices-die-hard/ TOKYO – When Fumino Sugiyama, then a Japanese women’s national team fencer, decided to introduce himself to one of his coaches as a transgender man, he wasn’t sure what to expect. What followed shocked him with his brutality. “You’ve never had sex with a real man,” the coach replied, then offered to do the act […]]]>


TOKYO – When Fumino Sugiyama, then a Japanese women’s national team fencer, decided to introduce himself to one of his coaches as a transgender man, he wasn’t sure what to expect.

What followed shocked him with his brutality.

“You’ve never had sex with a real man,” the coach replied, then offered to do the act himself, according to a letter Mr. Sugiyama wrote to Thomas last fall. Bach, President of the International Olympic Committee.

Mr. Sugiyama, 39, now an activist, wanted to give Mr. Bach an unvarnished picture of the deep-rooted discrimination in Japan, especially in the rigid world of sport. He also hoped Mr Bach would pressure the Japanese government over a bill protecting gay and transgender rights. This, Mr Sugiyama wrote, could protect “the next generation of athletes from what I have been through.”

But now, less than two months away from the Tokyo Olympics, hopes for the bill are running out. As a bipartisan committee put forward a draft measure, even its modest goal of calling discrimination “unacceptable” has proved too important to conservative lawmakers, who have blocked the bill from being considered by the government. whole Parliament.

What was supposed to be a first step towards equality instead revealed once again the strong opposition to LGBTQ rights on the part of the mainstream politicians of the family values ​​of the ruling Liberal Democratic Party. One member, when discussing the measure, said that homosexuals and transgendered people “go against the preservation of the species”. Another said it was “absurd” for transgender women to “demand” to use a women’s washroom or win track and field medals.

The reaction shows how far Japan must go to respect one of the principles of the Olympic Charter: that all discrimination must be eliminated.

Japan ranks penultimate in gay and transgender rights among nearly 40 rich countries within the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development. He is the only member of the Group of 7 Industrial Powers that has not legalized same-sex unions. And no athlete scheduled to compete for Japan at the Games has become gay or transgender, choosing instead to stay locked up, advocates say, for fear of a backlash from fans or sponsors.

“It’s very embarrassing,” said Kyoko Raita, executive board member of the Tokyo 2020 organizing committee and professor of sports history at Chukyo University.

The ruling party’s sponsor of the bill, Tomomi Inada, a former defense minister, said in a video posted on Twitter which she would not give up before the end of the current parliamentary session in mid-June.

“With this Olympic opportunity, let’s try to create this law,” Ms. Inada said in an interview. “If we miss this opportunity, it will be difficult. “

Even if passed, some activists say, the bill is too watered down to have much effect. The measure does not go so far as to completely ban prejudice in a society where homosexuals and transgender people are often afraid to reveal their sexuality or gender identity.

“I really don’t think the bill makes any sense,” said Shiho Shimoyamada, one of the few elite athletes in Japan who has publicly declared himself as gay.

“If people say, ‘I understand what it means to be LGTBQ but it’s a problem for the team’, there is no one who can judge these discriminatory practices” as illegal, “Ms. Shimoyamada said,” 26-year-old club footballer who played professionally in Germany for two years.

She said the Japanese sports community was particularly inflexible and intolerant, hampered by traditional expectations of femininity and masculinity. According to a survey by the Japan Sport Association, more than 40% of athletes who identify as gay, bisexual or transgender said they heard someone make discriminatory remarks.

Airi Murakami, 31, a former member of the women’s national rugby team who turned out to be gay in April, said she was bullied as a high school basketball player for attending a teammate. For years she struggled with feelings of guilt and shame.

“Expressing that you are part of the LGBTQ community” is difficult, said Ms. Murakami.

As difficult as it is to be openly gay in Japanese conformist society, in some ways public attitudes have evolved faster than those of the country’s political leaders.

Almost two-thirds of those polled by researchers at Hiroshima Shudo University in 2019 were in favor of marriage equality, up from just over half four years earlier. Almost 90 percent supported laws prohibiting discrimination against gay and transgender people.

In some ways, Japan has long had a fluid conception of gender and sexual orientation. Gay social life thrives in a large nightlife district of Tokyo’s Shinjuku district, and Japan has a famous tradition of transgender performing arts like Takarazuka, Noh, and Kabuki.

But such cultural acceptance does not always translate into political support for equal rights.

“Insisting on a politicized gender identity is grating in the ears of more conservative people,” said Jennifer Robertson, professor emeritus of anthropology at the University of Michigan who grew up in Japan. “They can have a friend who has sex with a same-sex partner, but they don’t want them to be integrated.”

Olympic officials explicitly banned discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation shortly after Tokyo won its Olympic bid seven years ago, in response to an anti-gay law passed in Russia ahead of the Winter Games from 2014 in Sochi.

Critics say the IOC acted too late – the clause was only added after the Sochi Games – and doubt the visibility of the Olympics will be of much help to Japan either.

“It is a false hope that the Olympics will bring more equality to the host country,” said Satoko Itani, associate professor of sports, gender and sexuality at Kansai University. (Like in Japan, conservatives in South Korea, which hosted the 2018 Winter Olympics, blocked legislation to protect sexual minorities.)

In Japan, Olympic organizers have offered only moderate support for gay and transgender rights.

In one of Seiko Hashimoto’s first acts after becoming chair of the Tokyo organizing committee, she visited Pride house in Tokyo, a center set up to support the gay and transgender community during the Olympics and beyond. (His predecessor, Yoshiro Mori, never came.)

Organizers admit their efforts for gay and transgender rights are modest and said they could not pressure the government on the pending bill. “In terms of sexual minorities, understanding has not progressed as far as it has in the West,” said Nobuyuki Sugimoto, who handles human rights issues for the committee.

Mr Sugimoto said the designers of the Olympic volunteers’ uniforms had incorporated advice for making the clothing unisex, although photos of uniforms for the medal presenters revealed last week showed men in pants and women in skirts. He said he did not know any of the thousands of organizing committee employees who had come out publicly. (Mr. Sugimoto seemed unaware that the spokesperson for the committee who interviewed him was declared bisexual.)

A more concerted push can come from the business community. A group of global businesses have signed a letter supporting the gay and transgender rights bill, including Olympic marketing partners like Coca-Cola and Intel.

Moriaki Kida, managing director of consultancy firm EY Japan, said that even if the current bill did not extend LGBTQ rights enough, it would be a good start. Just seeing the ruling party in Japan discussing gender diversity, he added, is something “I never imagined 10 years ago.”

Mr. Sugiyama, the retired fencer, said he too would accept gradual steps. In his response to Mr. Sugiyama’s letter, Mr. Bach, an Olympic gold medalist in fencing, did not address Japan’s bill. He said the IOC was developing a voluntary non-discrimination framework which was “a work in progress”.

“I am happy that he is promoting inclusion in sport,” Mr. Sugiyama said. ” I am realistic. If we are aiming for 120%, I would still settle for 80%, even 20%, because that would still be a step forward. “





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The Recorder – My Turn: Observations on China and Taiwan https://japononline.net/the-recorder-my-turn-observations-on-china-and-taiwan/ https://japononline.net/the-recorder-my-turn-observations-on-china-and-taiwan/#respond Fri, 04 Jun 2021 16:16:15 +0000 https://japononline.net/the-recorder-my-turn-observations-on-china-and-taiwan/ Recently, Richard Fein (“Taiwan and China: Will There Be War,” May 26) joined The Economist, The New York Times and various US military officials in raising the possibility of China invading Taiwan. Having lived and worked in Taiwan several months a year for the past few years, here are my observations. First, a demographic fact: […]]]>


Recently, Richard Fein (“Taiwan and China: Will There Be War,” May 26) joined The Economist, The New York Times and various US military officials in raising the possibility of China invading Taiwan. Having lived and worked in Taiwan several months a year for the past few years, here are my observations.

First, a demographic fact: most of the people living in Taiwan today were not alive when Chiang Kai-shek and his 30,000 followers fled to what was then an unconsolidated island territory after losing Chinese Civil War against Mao in 1949 (from 1895 to the end of World War II, Taiwan and the surrounding islands were colonized by Japan). The general response from my Taiwanese friends when asked if they were worried about a Chinese invasion is a shrug, because “it’s been like this our whole life.”

A strong cultural bond between Taiwan and Japan remains. According to the Taipei Times, a recent poll showed that more Taiwanese would rather be ruled by Japan again than by China. Numerous polls have revealed that an overwhelming majority of citizens identify as Taiwanese and not Chinese, despite the obvious linguistic connection (much like France and Quebec, which share a mother tongue but differ both culturally and even linguistically. ).

Xi Jinping, President of China, likes to threaten Taiwan over the bogus issue of “reunification” (fact: Taiwan was never part of the People’s Republic of China), and pressures governments around the world to do so. they do not recognize it or trade with it, including the sale of necessary vaccines.

It regularly sends jets over Taiwanese airspace. In response to a Taiwanese official’s invitation to Biden’s inauguration, Chinese military jets arrived from the west, soon chased by US and Taiwanese jets from the east. It is a regular phenomenon, just like industrial espionage.

As the New York Times recently reported, Taiwan is the world’s largest chip maker while China lacks a local industry. China’s solution was to send agents to buy Taiwanese software engineers (a problem so widespread that it is now a federal crime). Chinese military expansion in the South China Sea is also well documented.

And then there’s nearby Hong Kong, which serves as a despicable lesson in Taiwan, where Xi’s brutal crackdown on free speech has normalized the punishment or disappearance of protesters without due process. In response, Taiwan recently made it easier for Hong Kong people to obtain visas.

China is taking advantage of the opening up of Taiwanese democracy to foment cultural disturbances of all kinds, such as supporting pro-Chinese politicians (directly or through surrogates) and harassing Taiwanese religious institutions. A billboard in front of the most beautiful pagoda in Taipei says, “Tibetan Buddhism is not Buddhism.

Nonetheless, China is Taiwan’s biggest trading partner, and many Taiwanese companies have relocated their factories to the mainland where politically connected manufacturers are taking advantage of cheap, if not forced, labor. Readers may find it helpful to watch Heather White and Lynn Zhang’s documentary “Complicit” to learn more about the plight of the children who work in these factories, including Terry Gou’s Foxconn.

Many musicians I know regularly traveled to Shanghai and Beijing before COVID to work in places like Shanghai Disneyland. Taiwanese workers also benefit from a lower tax rate in China; part of Xi’s broader non-military strategy to subsume Taiwan to China through inextricable economic ties. So it’s complicated.

Then there is the personal antipathy between authoritarian lifelong dictator Xi and his political bureau of middle-aged men dressed alike and Taiwan’s first female president, Tsai Ing-wen: single, with a degree. in law from Cornell and a doctorate from the London School of Economics. During his tenure, Taiwan passed East Asia’s first same-sex marriage law and the cabinet includes a trans minister. The annual February 28 Peace and Holiday Park commemorates the suffering of Indigenous minorities, gay rights activists and political opponents of Chiang Kai-Shek (Taiwan did not directly elect the president until 1996; and Shek was , like Xi, a dictator for life).

I repeat, individual rights are non-existent in China.

Finally, Taiwanese politicians cannot openly assert their independence; yet collaborating too closely with China is politically anathema. The United States militarily defends Taiwan, despite the erroneous “one China” policy that we respect.

There are only two things Xi cannot risk being part of his legacy: losing a gun battle or having Taiwan officially become independent. So, at the moment, we’re probably stuck with the relentless Chinese bullying status quo of a Democratic ally of the United States.

Speculation about an impending military conflict may be good for traffic, but not for political stability.

Andy Jaffe lives in Conway.



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A decade in the game, LiSA continues to kill https://japononline.net/a-decade-in-the-game-lisa-continues-to-kill/ https://japononline.net/a-decade-in-the-game-lisa-continues-to-kill/#respond Fri, 04 Jun 2021 01:00:09 +0000 https://japononline.net/a-decade-in-the-game-lisa-continues-to-kill/ Hollywood struggled during the pandemic. Box office profits plummeted, theaters closed, and home streaming providers made a mint. In October, however, the animated film “Demon Slayer: Mugen Train” surprised everyone by breaking one box office record after another – and LiSA, the voice behind its opening theme, enjoyed many new levels of success. After writing […]]]>


Hollywood struggled during the pandemic. Box office profits plummeted, theaters closed, and home streaming providers made a mint. In October, however, the animated film “Demon Slayer: Mugen Train” surprised everyone by breaking one box office record after another – and LiSA, the voice behind its opening theme, enjoyed many new levels of success.

After writing and performing the opening tracks for the television series “Demon Slayer: Kimetsu no Yaiba”, as well as the follow-up feature, LiSA, whose stage name stands for “Love is Same All”, has seen its fan base flourish as the franchise gains popularity around the world. But that’s not the only thing she has to celebrate.

On May 19, the native of Gifu Prefecture, real name Risa Oribe, released a seven-track mini album titled “Ladybug” (stylized in all caps) to commemorate her 10th anniversary as a solo artist. It features collaborations with renowned musicians such as Grammy Award-winning guitarist B’z Takahiro Matsumoto, Yujin Kitagawa of Yuzu and Avu-chan of pop-rock group Queen Bee (Ziyoou-vachi).

“‘Ladybug’ is tentēmushi in Japanese, so that seemed like an appropriate name for my 10th anniversary record, ”LiSA, 33, told the Japan Times. “It’s a playful album incorporating a variety of styles. If I had to choose a song it would be ‘GL’ written by Avu-chan. The tempo is fast and there is rock and dance music besides me rapping. I just think it’s a fun trail.

LiSA decided to involve several popular artists on the EP to create something special to mark a decade in the industry. She says there have been times in the past where she has had doubts about herself, but now she’s proud of what she’s accomplished and has become more confident.

This confidence was certainly bolstered by the success of her fifth studio album “Leo-Nine” (styled as “LEO-NiNE”), released on October 14, the same day as her single “Homura” (“Flame”). Both debuted at No.1 on Billboard Japan’s Hot 100 simultaneously.

Shortly thereafter, “Demon Slayer: Mugen Train” was released, becoming the highest grossing film in Japanese box office history on December 26 and breaking the US box office record for opening weekend. most profitable foreign language film. He has since exceeded $ 400 million in worldwide sales.

“Although I knew the anime was one of Japan’s most popular exports, I feel like ‘Demon Slayer’ took things to another level,” LiSA said. “I fell in love with the manga and was blown away by the animation. I had never seen anything like it before. The creators felt a strong sense of responsibility for bringing this wonderful story to life and so was it for me with the music. To be involved in something like this is an honor, but there is a real pressure that goes with it. “

LiSA’s involvement in the “Demon Slayer” franchise began with the television series. In collaboration with composer Kayoko Kusano, she wrote “Gurenge” (“Red Lotus”) for the opening of the show. The title refers to the protagonist of the anime, Tanjiro Kamado, who overcomes difficult circumstances to become a hero, much like a lotus, a beautiful flower that miraculously grows in swamps and symbolizes transcendence in Buddhist culture. “Gurenge” became the first song by a female artist to exceed one million downloads on the Oricon charts.

“Homura” – the theme song from “Demon Slayer: Mugen Train” – proved even more popular. Grand Prix winner at the 2020 Japan Record Awards, he overtook the K-pop group BTS’s “Dynamite””To become the fastest song to rack up 100 million streams and over 191 million views on YouTube at the time of writing. Written with Yuki Kajiura, it’s a moving ballad about finding hope in the darkest moments, with an emphasis on one of the characters from “Demon Slayer”, Kyojuro Rengoku.

“He’s my favorite character,” says LiSA. “He’s cool, strong and sincere, like a real warrior. I wanted these characteristics to be reflected in the lyrics. I always go through the same approach when writing songs for anime. This time was no different. It’s just a matter of reading the original work and taking things from there. It always helps when you enjoy the story.

LiSA has a writing history for the anime. His big breakthrough in the music industry came in 2010 from “Angel Beats! », A series of 13 episodes about a boy losing his memory in the afterlife. Alongside singer Marina Nakamura, she sang for the in-story group of the Girls Dead Monster series. The duo released five singles, all of which ranked in the top 10.

“This opportunity arose about two years after I moved to Tokyo,” says LiSA. “At Gifu, I was in an independent group called Chucky. It was fun, but to really advance in my career I needed a bigger stage. I worked part time and played in the band, Love is Same All, then ‘Angel Beats!’ came around. It was a great moment for me because it opened many doors for me.

“I had watched cartoons as a kid, but I didn’t see anything as an adult because I was so focused on my music. When I had the gig with ‘Angel Beats!’ I started doing more research and got into a lot of different types of shows and movies. The best I have seen was’5 centimeters per second‘by Makoto Shinkai. Visually, it was stunning. It made me realize how advanced anime imagery has become since I was younger.

In 2011, LiSA released “Oath sign,” the opening theme of the 2011 action animated series “Fate / Zero” and his first single as a solo artist, as well as his debut EP, “Letters to U”. “. She wrote the lyrics for the seven tracks and composed the opening song, “Believe in Myself”.

“Becoming a singer was something I had dreamed of since I was a child, so having my own mini album to release made me feel like I had achieved the ambition of a lifetime,” says LiSA. “When I was younger I sang to myself, just because I loved doing it. My mentality changed while recording this record, especially with “Believe in yourself”. I realized that I wanted to sing for others. I was hoping people would hear this song and gain strength from it. “

Even though she has been a major player in the Japanese music industry for a decade, she is surprised at how much things have grown in recent years, despite the COVID-19 pandemic.

“Obviously, I appreciate the attention that ‘Gurenge’ and ‘Homura’ have garnered, but what’s even nicer is the fact that my other songs are now being recognized by people all over the world,” he says. it. “It’s a great feeling to know that your songs are heard in different parts of the world. I can’t wait to go on a foreign tour once the situation improves.

“The hardest thing over the past 18 months has been not being able to perform regularly live. The Record Awards were probably the highlight, however. When I received the award, the past 10 years crossed my mind. I was overcome with emotion. It’s been a long journey and now I’m looking forward to the next 10.

LiSA’s “Ladybug” album is now available on streaming services and in stores. For more information visit www.lxixsxa.com/LiSA_10th/album.

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