Japanese Culture – Japon Online http://japononline.net/ Fri, 14 Jan 2022 06:43:29 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://japononline.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default1-150x150.png Japanese Culture – Japon Online http://japononline.net/ 32 32 White-eyed reminder as Kim prepares for another Olympic race https://japononline.net/white-eyed-reminder-as-kim-prepares-for-another-olympic-race/ Fri, 14 Jan 2022 06:43:29 +0000 https://japononline.net/white-eyed-reminder-as-kim-prepares-for-another-olympic-race/ FILE – Shaun White of the United States is shown after his third run in the snowboarding halfpipe finals, Sunday, Dec. 19, 2021, at the Dew Tour in Copper Mountain, Colo. Shaun White is likely heading to the Olympics for a fifth time. For the first time, the snowboarding star and three-time halfpipe gold medalist […]]]>

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FILE – Shaun White of the United States is shown after his third run in the snowboarding halfpipe finals, Sunday, Dec. 19, 2021, at the Dew Tour in Copper Mountain, Colo. Shaun White is likely heading to the Olympics for a fifth time. For the first time, the snowboarding star and three-time halfpipe gold medalist will not be the favorite. (AP Photo/Hugh Carey, File)

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Nicknames are removed. The mop of red hair that once served as Shaun White’s signature look more than a decade ago is long gone.

The torch that the now 35-year-old snowboarding icon has carried so ably for so long since his first gold-medal run in the halfpipe in Turin 16 years ago has been taken up by a series of new comers who grew up watching it.

The group – led by Japan’s two-time silver medalist Ayumu Hirano – will stand atop the Genting Snow Park pipe and seek to do what has only been done once in the last four Games: ride the podium with White and the rest of the sport looking up.

For the first time in his career, White will head to the Olympics not as a favorite but as a winter lion trying to summon the kind of magic that has been hard to come by since returning for a three-day break. year.

White only secured a spot on the USA team in the final days of qualifying and hasn’t been on top of the medals stand since that final under pressure with Hirano and Australia’s Scotty James in Pyeongchang, where he collapsed in his mother’s arms. Cathy after the medal presentation, physically and emotionally exhausted.

He’s back for what’s almost certainly one last run, where he’ll see a changing of the guard up close. The Japanese, led by Hirano and world champion Yuto Totsuka, dominated the halfpipe with the kind of boundary-pushing tricks that were once White’s domain.

Hirano became the first snowboarder to land a “triple cork” – three head-to-board flips – in competition in December, the next logical step in progression four years after White won gold drilling double cork 1440s. consecutive (four twists). It’s a milestone that Hirano achieved largely thanks to the push of Totsuka and his younger brother Kaishu.

“(The Japanese) have a great team culture,” said Mike Jankowski, head coach of the US Olympic snowboarding and freestyle skiing programs. “You see them all day. They have fun. They laugh. I mean, obviously, they’re fierce competitors and they’re here to win. But they’re also the camaraderie that I see with them is fun.

The increasingly high risk-reward nature of the sport adds a layer of uncertainty that was missing from the sport’s flagship event.

At least on the men’s side. Things are a little clearer on the women’s halfpipe, where American Chloe Kim will be looking to end the gold medal she won as a fresh-faced teenager in Korea four years ago. year.

Although Kim understands the pressure she will face in China as the only one competing with an Olympic gold medal on home soil, she is barely out of her comfort zone. She came to Korea as the sport’s Next Big Thing and left as a champion while navigating the white-hot spotlight thanks to her precocity and Korean heritage.

In comparison, doing it again doesn’t seem so bad. If anything, she came to embrace the stakes. This was seen at a pre-Olympic event in December when she drilled the last of her three-pointers to edge past Spain’s Queralt Castellet.

“It was weird because that third run was the quietest I’ve felt,” Kim said. “It was really an all-or-nothing feeling. I think in those moments you get this serene feeling where it’s like you’re going broke, you know?”

Or in Kim’s case, going for the gold.

Other things to look for during three very busy weeks in Zhangjiakou.

LINDSEY’S LONG RUN: American snowboardcross star Lindsey Jacobellis will make one last effort to fill the one hole in her resume when the five-time world champion goes for another Olympic gold medal.

Jacobellis settled for silver in Turin in 2006 when she fell after catching her board in celebration as she soared over the final jump and failed to medal in Vancouver, Sochi or Pyeongchang. The 36-year-old made peace a long time ago with her late foul in Italy and arrives with some momentum after claiming third place at a World Cup in Russia.

JAMIE’S JOURNEY: Three-time Olympic medalist Jamie Anderson will look to extend her reign at the top of women’s slopestyle when she battles for a third gold medal to join those she won in Russia and Korea.

Anderson, 31, who landed a double cork 1080 cab for the first time in competition at Mammoth Mountain in January, thinks she hasn’t peaked yet.

“I don’t feel like I’ve reached my full potential yet,” she said.

RED ALERT: Red Gerard didn’t expect to win slopestyle gold in Korea as he looked wide-eyed as a 17-year-old at his first Olympics. It happened anyway.

Four years later, Gerard will travel to China as one of the favorites along with Canadians Seb Toussaint and Mark McMorris, among others. Now 21, Gerard hopes his sport will move away from the twists and turns that have come to define it towards something more creative.

SECOND HELP? : Ester Ledecka achieved the biggest feat of the 2018 Olympics when the snowboarder from the Czech Republic beat a stacked field that included American star Lindsey Vonn in the super-G alpine race.

Ledecka celebrated with Kentucky Fried Chicken then went out and captured the parallel giant slalom on her snowboard days later, becoming the third person to win gold in different sports at the same Winter Games.

She’s a heavy favorite to repeat in PGS and won’t come out of nowhere this time in super-G like she did in Korea. The 26-year-old finished 10th in the World Cup standings in 2020 and 2021.

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AP National Writer Eddie Pells contributed to this report.

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More AP Winter Olympics: https://apnews.com/hub/winter-olympics and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports

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Museum of Work & Culture Shares Japanese-American Stories During WWII | Entertainment https://japononline.net/museum-of-work-culture-shares-japanese-american-stories-during-wwii-entertainment/ Wed, 12 Jan 2022 11:00:00 +0000 https://japononline.net/museum-of-work-culture-shares-japanese-american-stories-during-wwii-entertainment/ WOONSOCKET – The Museum of Labor and Culture will present “Righting a Wrong: Japanese Americans and World War II,” a poster exhibit from the Smithsonian Institution. The exhibition will open on Thursday, January 13 and will remain in the changing gallery until March. The exhibit traces the history of the Japanese national and Japanese American […]]]>

WOONSOCKET – The Museum of Labor and Culture will present “Righting a Wrong: Japanese Americans and World War II,” a poster exhibit from the Smithsonian Institution. The exhibition will open on Thursday, January 13 and will remain in the changing gallery until March.

The exhibit traces the history of the Japanese national and Japanese American incarceration during World War II and the people who survived it. Some 40 years later, members of the Japanese-American community led the nation to confront the evil it had done – and urged Congress to do something about it.

Based on an original exhibit at the National Museum of American History, the “Righting a Wrong” poster exhibit revolves around eight fundamental questions that encourage viewers to engage in a dialogue about how it happened and on the possibility of this happening again. Embracing themes as relevant today as they were 75 years ago, the poster exhibition tackles themes of identity, immigration, prejudice, civil rights, courage and what it means to be American.

Complementing the Smithsonian’s poster exhibit, the museum will also feature a short documentary, musical reflections, informational videos, explanatory texts, illustrative graphic novel panels, a digital exhibit, visual arts and a book corner where visitors can learn about Japanese American experiences during this period through classic children’s books.

In addition, the museum will host a variety of virtual programs during the exhibition installation, sponsored by the New England Japanese American Citizens League. These include:

• Sunday, January 23, 1 p.m. “The Power of Objects:” Noriko Sanefuji, Smithsonian Museum Specialist and Co-Curator of “Righting a Wrong,” highlights work in telling the story of the incarceration of Native Americans Japanese through artifacts.

• Saturday February 19, at 1 p.m., “Remembrance Day 2022: Executive Order 9066 and its legacies:” Ken Nomiyama (Tule Lake Committee) and Jim McIlwain (New England Japanese American Citizens League) will speak on Remembrance Day 80 , discussing President Roosevelt’s Executive Order 9066 and its consequences during World War II and today.

• Saturday, March 12, 1 pm: David Sakura and his guests will discuss their experiences and those of their families during and after World War II. This program will be facilitated by Erin Aoyama, Ph.D. candidate in American Studies, Brown University.

Illustrator Rae Kuruhara celebrates Japanese-American food culture by demonstrating how to make onigiri and spam musubi in two short videos and a comic book.

“Righting a mistake: Japanese Americans and World War II” was developed by the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History and adapted for travel by the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service. The traveling exhibit and poster exhibit are funded by a grant from the Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center; the Terasaki Family Foundation and CL Ehn & Ginger Lew.

Museum of Labor and Culture The opening hours of the museum are Tuesday to Friday, 9:30 am to 4 pm; Saturday, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. For more information, visit www.rihs.org/locations/museum-of-work-culture or email mowc@rihs.org.

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How the Chinese language modernized https://japononline.net/how-the-chinese-language-modernized/ Mon, 10 Jan 2022 11:03:33 +0000 https://japononline.net/how-the-chinese-language-modernized/ Amid the turmoil of the early twentieth century, reformers were also faced with a larger question: Once Chinese traditions are overthrown, what cultural norms should succeed them? Most of the people Tsu writes about have looked to the United States. Many of them studied at American universities in the nineties, subsidized by money the United […]]]>

Amid the turmoil of the early twentieth century, reformers were also faced with a larger question: Once Chinese traditions are overthrown, what cultural norms should succeed them? Most of the people Tsu writes about have looked to the United States. Many of them studied at American universities in the nineties, subsidized by money the United States received from China as compensation after the defeat of the anti-Western Boxer Rebellion. Zhou Houkun, who invented a Chinese typewriter, studied at MIT Hu Shi, an academic and diplomat who helped elevate the vernacular into the national language, went to Cornell. Lin Yutang, who designed a Chinese typewriter, studied at Harvard. Wang Jingchun, who paved the way for Chinese telegraphy, said, more ardently than accurately, “Our government is American; our constitution is American; many of us feel like Americans.

This focus on the United States might appeal to American readers. But, in the later years of the Qing Dynasty and the beginning of the Republican period, Japan was a much more influential model of modern reform. Oddly enough, Tsu barely mentions this in his book. Japan – whose military victory over Russia in 1905 had been hailed across Asia as a sign that a modern Asian nation could stand up to the West – was the main vehicle for concepts that changed the social landscape, politics, culture and linguistics in China. . Over a thousand Chinese students joined Zhou and Hu as Boxer Indemnity Scholars in the United States between 1911 and 1929, but over eight thousand Chinese were already studying in Japan in 1905. And many schools in China employed Japanese technical and scientific professors.

Caricature by Dahlia Gallin Ramirez

It is true that Japan’s industrial, military, and educational reforms since the Meiji Restoration of 1868 were themselves based on Western models, including artistic movements, such as Impressionism and Surrealism. But these ideas were transmitted to China by Chinese students, revolutionaries and intellectuals in Japan, and had a direct and lasting impact on written and spoken Chinese. Many scientific and political terms in Chinese – such as “philosophy”, “democracy”, “electricity”, “telephone”, “socialism”, “capitalism” and “communism” – have been coined in Japanese by combining Chinese characters.

Demands for radical reform came to a head in 1919, with a student protest in Beijing, first against the provisions of the Treaty of Versailles which allowed Japan to take possession of German territories in China, and then against classical Confucian traditions as the we believed in the path of progress. A range of political orientations combined in the so-called New Culture movement, from John Dewey-inspired pragmatism of Hu Shi to early converts to socialism. Where New Culture protesters could agree, as Tsu notes, was on the critical importance of mass literacy.

Downgrading classical Chinese and promoting colloquial writing was a step in this direction, although the abolition of Chinese characters was still too drastic for many to consider. Yet, as Tsu puts it, some nationalists who ruled China until 1949 were in favor of at least one simplification of the characters, just like the Communists. Nationalist attempts at simplification met with opposition from conservatives, who wanted to protect traditional Chinese written culture; the Communists were much more radical and never gave up on the idea of ​​switching to the Roman alphabet. In the Soviet Union, the Roman alphabet had been used to impose political uniformity on many different peoples, including Muslims accustomed to the Arabic script. The Soviets supported and subsidized Chinese efforts to follow their example. For Communists, as Tsu notes, the goal was simple: “If the Chinese could read easily, they could be radicalized and converted to Communism with the new script.

The long conflict with Japan, from 1931 to 1945, put a temporary end to language reform. The nationalists, who waged most of the fighting, were simply struggling to survive. Communists spent more time thinking about ideological issues. Radical language reform only began in earnest after the defeat of the Nationalists in 1949 and forced to withdraw to Taiwan. Mao, in the decade that followed, ushered in two linguistic revolutions: Pinyin, the Romanized transcription that has become the norm across China (and now pretty much everywhere else), and so-called Simplified Chinese.

The Committee on Script Reform, established in 1952, began by publishing some eight hundred recast characters. Others were published, and some were revised, over the following decades. The new characters, created with much less strokes, were “faithful to the egalitarian principles of socialism,” Tsu says. Communist cadres rejoiced that “the voice of the people was finally heard.” Among the beneficiaries were “the workers and peasants of China”. After all, “Mao said that the masses are the real heroes and that their opinions should be trusted.”

Tsu rightly attributes to the Communist government the increased literacy level in China, which she tells us reached ninety-seven percent in 2018. But we have to take the claim with caution according to the statement. where these gains come from upward agitation. “Nothing like this had ever been attempted in the history of the world,” she wrote. The Japanese might not agree; Ninety percent of the Japanese population had attended primary school by 1900. It is also questionable whether simplified characters played such a large role in China’s high literacy rate that Tsu is inclined to. think so. In Taiwan and Hong Kong, traditional characters have remained largely intact; if it is proven that children have much more difficulty learning to read and write, it would be good to know. The mere fact of being told that “the voice of the people was finally heard” is not quite sufficient to justify this thesis. And, while there are benefits to learning a drastically revised script, there are also losses. Not only are the new characters less elegant, but books written the old-fashioned way become difficult to understand.

It was part of the point. In 1956, Tao-Tai Hsia, then a professor at Yale, wrote that the strengthening of communist propaganda was “the main motivation” for language reform: “The idea of ​​getting rid of parts of China’s cultural past that the Communists deem undesirable through the linguistic process is always present in the minds of communist cultural workers. It was written during the Cold War, but surely Hsia was right. After all, as Tsu points out, “those who expressed their dissatisfaction with the Pinyin reform would be swallowed up in the years of persecution that followed,” and those who complained about the simplified characters fared little better. success.

Tsu diligently links the story of language reform to technology – we learn a lot about heroic efforts to adapt modern composition to the character-based system – and that story continues through the digital age. The speed with which these advances have been made is indeed impressive. In the 1970s, more than seventy percent of all print information disseminated in China was hot-stamped. Today, as Tsu enthusiastically writes, his style is sometimes reminiscent of Mao period newspapers such as China is rebuilding itself“Information processing is” the tool that opened the door to the advanced technology-driven future that decades of China’s language reform and state planning have finally opened. “

Tsu celebrates these technical innovations by highlighting the personal stories of key individuals, which often read like traditional Confucian morality tales of terrible trials overcome through tenacity and hard work. Zhi Bingyi worked on his ideas on Chinese computer language in a squalid prison cell during the Cultural Revolution, writing his calculations on a cup of tea after his guards even took his toilet paper. Wang Xuan, a pioneer of laser composition systems, was so hungry during Mao’s disastrous Great Leap Forward campaign in 1960 that “his body swelled with fatigue, but he continued to work tirelessly.” . Such anecdotes add welcome color to technical explanations of phonetic scripts, typewriters, telegraphy, card catalog systems, and computers. Phrases like “Finally, through a reverse decompression process, Wang converted vector images to bitmaps of dots for digital output” can get boring.

Today in the age of standardized word processors and Chinese social media applications like WeChat, Pinyin and Characters are seamlessly connected. Users typically type Pinyin on their keyboard while the screen displays simplified characters, providing an array of options for resolving homonyms. (Older users can draw the characters on their smartphones.) China, as Tsu says, “will finally have a chance to communicate with the world digitally.” Old struggles over written forms can seem redundant. But the language policy persists, especially in the way the government communicates with its citizens.

“Kingdom of Characters” mentions all major political events, from the Boxer Rebellion to the rise of Xi Jinping. And yet, one might get the impression that language development was largely a story of ingenious inventions devised by courageous individuals overcoming enormous technical hurdles. His story ends on a triumphant note; she notes that written Chinese is now “more and more widely used, learned, propagated, studied, and precisely transformed into electronic data.” It’s about as immortal as a living script can hope to get it. Continuing in the same vein, she writes: “The Chinese Scripture Revolution has always been the true revolution of the people – not ‘the people’ as determined by Communist ideology, but the larger multitude who have fueled it with innovators and infantry. “


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Japanese architecture informs Minnesota home by architect Salmela https://japononline.net/japanese-architecture-informs-minnesota-home-by-architect-salmela/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 18:00:00 +0000 https://japononline.net/japanese-architecture-informs-minnesota-home-by-architect-salmela/ A cluster of timber-clad buildings surround a central courtyard of this Minnesota residence of American firm Salmela Architect that was designed for clients who previously lived in Japan. The project, called Fifty-Acre Wood, is located in Stillwater, a historic town along the St Croix River just beyond Minneapolis. The house sits on a fifty-acre (20-hectare) […]]]>

A cluster of timber-clad buildings surround a central courtyard of this Minnesota residence of American firm Salmela Architect that was designed for clients who previously lived in Japan.


The project, called Fifty-Acre Wood, is located in Stillwater, a historic town along the St Croix River just beyond Minneapolis. The house sits on a fifty-acre (20-hectare) plot, the majority of which has been granted by clients to the Minnesota Land Trust for permanent conservation.

Fifty-Acre Wood is a home in Minnesota that was designed by Salmela Architect

Located near a waterfall, the property features an oak forest and agricultural fields reseeded with native herbs. The region is home to a variety of wildlife, including black bears, foxes, sandhill cranes and blue herons.

The owners are a married couple – Yuko and Paul – who met and lived in Japan before moving to Minnesota with their two young sons. Paul grew up exploring the Sainte-Croix River valley and wanted his children to have a similar experience.

Fifty acres of timber were covered with timber
It is made up of a set of volumes that house living and sleeping areas.

Unlike Paul’s upbringing, Yuko grew up in the dense Japanese city of Fukuoka, and at first she felt uncertain about living in a wide open landscape.

“His wishes were for a home that felt protected, with the inclusion of familiar cultural references in that unfamiliar setting,” said Salmela Architect, a Minnesota firm known for designing homes in a regional Modernist style.

Interior image of a living space at Fifty-Acre Wood
The house has a view of the surrounding landscape

The architects designed a series of buildings that are organized around a central courtyard. The design is based on two references: a group of farm buildings with a shed roof and a Japanese courtyard house with sheltered exterior walkways.

The main house is made up of two L-shaped pavilions linked by a glass passage. Nearby are an independent guest house, a garage and a multipurpose building.

The open kitchen of Fifty-Acre Wood
The interior benefits from a simple and minimal material palette

“Each of the five structures is positioned based on its function, solar orientation, and relationship to specific landscape features,” the company said.

The facades are clad in cedar and the roofs are clad in standing seam metal. Interior finishes include slate tile, quartz countertops, and ceilings covered in pale-toned lime wood.

Windows frame different views across the house
Cobbled walkways surround the house

In the main accommodation there is a clear separation between public and private spaces.

A pavilion includes a semi-open kitchen, a dining room and a living room. It sits on an east-west axis and looks out over a gently rolling field.

Image of a living room with a wooden roof in Fifty-Acre Wood
The living spaces have views of the site in all directions

“The south-facing floor-to-ceiling windows create a sense of interior-exterior continuity, which is reinforced by horizontal wood slats on the exterior soffit and interior ceiling,” the team said.

“This Japanese architectural reference helps soften the acoustics of the hard surfaces in the wide open room.”

In the kitchen, the team provided views in all directions. A large window to the north offers sight lines of the house’s courtyard, entry path, and driveway, providing a sense of security.

The house lacks a traditional hearth. Instead, you enter through a threshold made up of “symmetrical slat walls” that sit between the kitchen and a cloakroom.

“While guests were initially hesitant about the atypical arrival sequence, they expressed how comfortable it was to welcome people into their homes without the typical embarrassment associated with a formal home,” said the team.

The dining room of the Fifty-Acre Wood residence
The house has an open concept

The house’s other pavilion, which houses the bedrooms, stretches from north to south and hugs the edge of a forest.

“The three bedrooms and the two ofuro – shower and tub rooms – overlook the oak forest, which filters the warm morning light through its leaves, signaling the start of the day,” the studio said.

Full height windows allow light to enter the space
Tiles cover the floors of the common living spaces

The sleeping areas are arranged along a hallway which also serves as a workspace.

“It stays in the shade throughout the work day, creating an ideal glare-free environment until the low evening sun signals dinner time,” the company said.

Image of a bedroom at home
Sleeping areas are accessible along a hallway

Throughout the residence, the team has incorporated a number of elements to help reduce energy consumption. These include operable windows, a hydronic underfloor heating system, an air-to-air heat exchanger and a high level of insulation.

“Six-foot-deep eaves and southerly orientation allow for an optimal passive solar strategy that maximizes winter heat gain while completely blocking out the midsummer sun,” the team added.

Image of a bathroom in Fifty-Acre Wood
Windows were randomly placed on the walls

The house also has three skylights that open and close, allowing hot air to escape. At night, the boxes are lit by electric lights.

Beyond the main house, the team have created a guesthouse to the west, which provides a level of separation and privacy for overnight visitors, including Yuko’s parents from Japan.

Image of a home study space
A sculptural fireplace is framed by a square window

To the north is a two-stall garage and the “barn” which is a multipurpose space for recreation and storage. The buildings are accessed by cobbled walkways that surround the courtyard.

“Exterior walkways surround the interior courtyard strewn with native vegetation – a microcosm and a counterpoint to the larger landscape restoration project,” the team said.

An overhanging roof provides shade for the house
The house has been fitted with a number of environmental and green systems

Other projects of Salmela Architect include a house for a physicist and an ophthalmologist which is supposed to look like a “scientific instrument with several viewing openings” and a solar-powered house which was created for a professor of architecture.

The photograph is by Corey Gaffer.


Project credits:

Architect: Salmela Architect
Team: David Salmela (principal), Kai Salmela (design manager), Emre Erenler
Energy consultant: Malini Srivastava
Structural engineer: Meyer borgman johnson
Service provider: Cates Fine Houses


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News Browser: How are “deepfakes” created and can technology be used for good? https://japononline.net/news-browser-how-are-deepfakes-created-and-can-technology-be-used-for-good/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 22:00:36 +0000 https://japononline.net/news-browser-how-are-deepfakes-created-and-can-technology-be-used-for-good/ This image from an academic article titled “A Style-Based Generator Architecture for Generative Adversarial Networks” shows the faces of non-existent people created using artificial intelligence. The Mainichi Shimbun answers some common questions readers may have about “deepfakes,” bogus but compelling digital images and videos. Question: How do you create deepfake images and videos? Answer: Deepfakes […]]]>

This image from an academic article titled “A Style-Based Generator Architecture for Generative Adversarial Networks” shows the faces of non-existent people created using artificial intelligence.

The Mainichi Shimbun answers some common questions readers may have about “deepfakes,” bogus but compelling digital images and videos.

Question: How do you create deepfake images and videos?

Answer: Deepfakes are created by Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) – a type of artificial intelligence that mimics the human brain – which have been trained on huge amounts of data. And technology has advanced by defining an AI that creates deepfakes like human faces against another AI that detects forgeries.

Q: What kind of things can you do using technology?

A: In addition to pictures and videos, it is now possible to create sound that looks exactly like a particular person. In some cases, deepfake technology has been used to make faces of non-existent people for use in advertisements. Technology to seamlessly change gender, age, skin color, and other traits is also advancing.

Q: Wouldn’t it be scary if your face and voice were used without your knowledge?

A: In California, it is now illegal to deceive voters by creating and broadcasting politician deepfakes. There is a risk that people’s photos on social media will be used to make deepfakes without their permission. If you find anything suspicious about a video or picture, you shouldn’t share it.

Q: Wouldn’t that be great technology if it wasn’t used with malicious intent?

A: AI-based technologies are increasingly expected in the arts and culture. If deepfake technology is used for things like entertainment and painting, it will likely open up a significant new market segment. For example, new pieces were created by teaching AIs to the works of Japanese manga artist Osamu Tezuka and 17th-century Dutch master Rembrandt paintings. However, many issues remain, including how to deal with the dignity of the deceased and decide who owns the copyright. It is essential to discuss the rules to be established.

(Japanese original by Ryo Watanabe, Department of Scientific and Environmental Information)


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Happy New Year 2022: New Year’s culinary traditions around the world https://japononline.net/happy-new-year-2022-new-years-culinary-traditions-around-the-world/ Sat, 01 Jan 2022 02:10:00 +0000 https://japononline.net/happy-new-year-2022-new-years-culinary-traditions-around-the-world/ Happy New Year 2022: New Year’s Eve is a day of celebration and a new beginning. People all over the world are celebrating the occasion in a unique cultural way, which also includes lavish food and drink. Let’s take a look at what ends up on people’s plates around the world on New Year’s Eve. […]]]>

Happy New Year 2022: New Year’s Eve is a day of celebration and a new beginning. People all over the world are celebrating the occasion in a unique cultural way, which also includes lavish food and drink. Let’s take a look at what ends up on people’s plates around the world on New Year’s Eve.

Tamales, Mexico

The people of the Central American region welcome the New Year with a delicious dish called Tamales. This dish consists of corn dough stuffed with meat, cheese, and other mouthwatering additions. Tamales are usually wrapped in a banana leaf or corn husk and are a staple, especially during the holiday season. This Mexican festive dish is often served with menudo, a tripe and hominy soup known for hangovers.

Tamales are usually wrapped in a banana leaf or corn husk and are a staple, especially during the holiday season. (Image: Shutterstock)

Marzipanschwein or Glücksschwein, in Austria and Germany

These European countries like to celebrate the start of the new year with several festive foods, one of which happens to be little marzipan pigs, called marzipan schwein. Known as lucky pigs, or Glücksschwein in German, these miniature cookies or pastries are made of all kinds of things and are common gifts in Austria and Germany.

Also read: Happy New Year 2022: WhatsApp photos, wishes, images, status, quotes, messages and greetings to share with your loved ones

Soba noodles, Japan

In the Far East, the New Year is often celebrated with a steaming bowl of tasty noodle soup. The Japanese like to sip a bowl of buckwheat soba noodles, or toshikoshi soba, at midnight on New Years Eve to say goodbye to the past year and welcome the year to come. Long noodles symbolize longevity and prosperity in Japanese culture.

Long noodles symbolize longevity and prosperity in Japanese culture. (Image: Shutterstock)

Cotechino con lenticchie, Italy

Italians mark the start of the new year with a traditional cotechino con lenticchie. This dish consists of a sausage and lentil stew that is supposed to bring good luck, because lentils represent money and good fortune.

Italians mark the start of the new year with a traditional cotechino con lenticchie. (Image: Shutterstock)

Kransekage, Denmark and Norway

In the Nordic region, the New Year is marked with a crown cake or the Kransekage as it is called in Danish. The cake tower made up of many concentric rings of superimposed cakes is designed for New Years Eve.

In the Nordic region, the New Year is marked with a crown cake or the Kransekage as it is called in Danish.

Read all the latest news, breaking news and news on the coronavirus here.


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13 Seattle-area arts and culture events to look forward to in 2022 https://japononline.net/13-seattle-area-arts-and-culture-events-to-look-forward-to-in-2022/ Thu, 30 Dec 2021 14:00:00 +0000 https://japononline.net/13-seattle-area-arts-and-culture-events-to-look-forward-to-in-2022/ Can we finally welcome the comeback of the theater and many other live performances in 2022, to join the artistic groups that have reopened in 2021? Fingers crossed and fervent wishes sent for an end to the pandemic, here are some of the artistic and cultural events we look forward to seeing in the New […]]]>

Can we finally welcome the comeback of the theater and many other live performances in 2022, to join the artistic groups that have reopened in 2021? Fingers crossed and fervent wishes sent for an end to the pandemic, here are some of the artistic and cultural events we look forward to seeing in the New Year. (As always, please check the event websites for COVID requirements and the latest information, and consider safety recommendations from local health authorities as they are updated.)

Classical music

Sibelius cycle

Seattle Symphony is embarking on an ambitious two-year Sibelius cycle, presenting the seven symphonies of Finnish composer Jean Sibelius and the original version of his Violin Concerto. Each program also includes new works – world premieres from Seattle Symphony commissions – by contemporary composers responding to Sibelius pieces. The cycle begins with Seattle Symphony Music Director Thomas Dausgaard conducting Sibelius’ First Symphony in February and his Second Symphony in April.

Symphony No. 1, February 3-5; Symphony No. 2, April 7-9; Benaroya Hall, 200 University Street, Seattle; $ 24 to $ 134; seattlesymphony.org. Both programs will also be streamed live on live.seattlesymphony.org ($ 129.99 / year or $ 12.99 / month subscription) and available for on-demand viewing for one week after the initial date..

“Blue”

This new opera, describing an African-American family experiencing the joy of raising a son and the grief of having their son killed by a police officer, was rated by the Washington Post in 2020 as “a triumph” and “the best. new opera which hardly anyone has seen. Created by composer Jeanine Tesori and librettist Tazewell Thompson, the opera premiered in July 2019 at the Glimmerglass Festival, but its 2020 dates at Kennedy Center and Lincoln Center, among others, have been wiped out by pandemic shutdowns. Fortunately, the New York Times opera called “powerful – as well as sadly topical” will soon be seen in more places, with the Seattle Opera among the companies slated to perform in 2022.

February 26-March 12; McCaw Hall, 321 Mercer St., Seattle; $ 35 to $ 249; seattleopera.org.

– JIT

To dance

whim for him

Leader in the presentation of free outdoor dance throughout the pandemic, the contemporary company of Oliver Wevers returns to the cinema – three of them – present a trio of world premieres, choreographers Ethan Colangelo, Jakevis Thomason and Wevers himself.

January 21-29, Cornish Playhouse, 201 Mercer St., Seattle; January 26, Vashon Center for the Arts, 19600 Vashon Highway SW, Vashon; January 27, Whidbey Island Center for the Arts, 565 Camano Ave., Langley; $ 5 to $ 60; caprice.org.

“Swan Lake”

While it was a joy to see the Pacific Northwest Ballet tentatively return to performing (both fall repertoire programs were small-scale subscriber-only works), I can’t wait for them to dive deep – a swan dive, so to speak – in an enormous and glorious ballet of stories, with the rising score by Tchaikovsky and a long, long row of swan ballerinas on pointes. Bring it on.

April 15-24; McCaw Hall, 321 Mercer St., Seattle; $ 30 to $ 190 (digital access only $ 35); pnb.org.

Mark Morris Dance Group and Musical Ensemble

Still beautifully musical, the Seattle native’s longtime modern dance company returns to Meany Hall, with its own musicians, to perform three contemporary works: “Words,” to music by Mendelssohn; “Rock of Ages” on Schubert and “Festival Dance” on a work for three pianos by Hummel.

April 21-23; Meany Hall, University of Washington campus, Seattle; $ 70; Meanycenter.org.

– MM

Music

Jazmine Sullivan

Last year, Jazmine Sullivan shattered a six-year album drought with her acclaimed “Heaux Tales”, reminding the world of her status as R&B royalty. The arrival of the worthwhile project after one of the singer’s prolonged interruptions felt like a low-key event – as “low key” as it gets when your album launch features at least one Super Bowl duet with Eric Church. Tickets to hear Sullivan’s captivating meditations on womanhood and relationships, spliced ​​into stereotypically defying vignettes on “Heaux Tales,” at Paramount were quickly picked up – many by opportunistic resellers it seems, as around 200 resale tickets were available at the time of writing. But if anyone’s voice is worth paying a premium, it’s Sullivan’s.

February 17, Paramount Theater, 911 Pine St., Seattle; to settle; stgpresents.com.

Billie Eilish

After pandemic delays, the biggest American pop star of Gen Z is finally returning to Washington as a real arena headliner with a two-night sold-out stage at the Climate Pledge Arena. The wait was long enough for Eilish to unload an acclaimed second album in last year’s hypnotically sparse film “Happier Than Ever,” backed by an Apple TV + doc and his own special Disney + concert. – the new pandemic standard for superstar album deployments. Two years after winning the Grammy Awards, the 20-year-old reformed neo-goth pop juggernaut has a chance to win three of the top four at this year’s ceremony, along with his big brother / writing partner Finneas for best. new artist separately.

March 25-26, Climate Pledge Arena, 334 First Ave. N., Seattle; to settle; Climatepledgearena.com.

Olivia rodrigo

2021 belonged to Olivia Rodrigo, the queen of pop who is fortunate enough to follow in Eilish’s Grammy footsteps. Just a week after the start of the new year, Rodrigo, the last teenage Disney star to climb the pop charts, dropped the song of the year with “Driver’s License” – a love smash that got America in her feelings like no one over the age of 21 could. The 18-year-old quickly stifled whispers of a hit, months later, releasing her acclaimed debut album “SOUR”, which evokes cutscenes of Taylor Swift singer-songwriter and pop-punk. from the turn of the century. While she can easily play in the shiny all-new hockey arena across town, Rodrigo’s first headlining tour arrives at the relatively intimate WAMU Theater on just three dates.

April 6, WAMU Theater, 800 Occidental Ave. S., Seattle; to settle; lumenfield.com.

– SIR

Theater

600 highwaymen: “A thousand ways (third part): an assembly”

Of all the experiences with the theater of the pandemic era, “A Thousand Ways” must be the most sensitive to the moment and to the bizarre new conditions in which we have lived: locked in and fundamentally alienated from one another, but intimately linked to strangers across the globe in our questions (what’s going on? For how long? Will it get me or someone I love?) and our fear. “A Thousand Ways” began in September, when pairs of strangers volunteered to call each other on the phone and answer prompts and sometimes intimate questions. This continued in November, when pairs of strangers met face-to-face at On the Boards (separated by a plexiglass barrier) to do the same. In “Part Three,” 12 strangers will come together in a room to collectively tell a story of perseverance. It sounds odd and slightly awkward, but it is also happening right now.

March 3-12; On the Boards of Directors, 100 W. Roy St., Seattle; $ 20 to $ 28; ontheboards.org.

“Pewter cat shoes”

In this twisted 2018 piece by Trish Harnetiaux, shredder employees from a shoe store somewhere in the Pacific Northwest take to the wilderness for a little self-discovery and teamwork commissioned by the employer. What happens next gets a bit swirling: there’s a new employee who needs to be introduced to the mysteries of the workplace “system”, someone working on a nacho novel and a mysterious casino in the mountains. Directed by Maggie L. Rogers.

April 15-May 7; Washington Ensemble Theater at 12th Avenue Arts, 1620 12th Ave., Seattle; ticket price not yet announced; washington ensemble.org.

“Sell Kabul”

The year is 2013 and the Obama administration has started withdrawing its troops from Afghanistan. Taroon, who worked as a translator for US forces, is hiding in his sister’s apartment in Kabul – he is a target of the Taliban – and is trying to get the special immigrant visa the US owes him. Meanwhile, his wife, who lives separately, has just given birth. A New York Times reviewer describes Sylvia Khoury’s play as having “elements of a Greek tragedy and spy thriller … if I bit my nails again, I would be out of my nails now.” Lucky for us, local genius Valerie Curtis-Newton leads – she excels at incredibly complex relationships, high-stakes decisions, the human consequences of seemingly impersonal political decisions and cultural forces, and the other things that make Selling Kabul vibrate. “.

April 22-May 22; Seattle Representative, 155 Mercer St., Seattle; ticket price not yet announced; seattlerep.org.

– BK

Visual art

Christina quarles

You have never seen a body like the bodies of painter Christina Quarles: they are rubbery and liquid, with improbable geometries and impossible physics, and sometimes they are stacked and fused, like several selves bursting out of a single piece of flesh. Which really makes sense when you learn that the Los Angeles-based artist paints explicitly about gender and race – but she’s also very interested in painting. “The paintings give the impression that they speak ambiguously about the painting itself,” critic Debra Brehmer recently wrote in Hyperallergic, “with the characters playing a supporting role.”

from February 12 to June 5; Frye Museum of Art, 704 Terry Ave., Seattle; free; frymuseum.org.

“Our blue planet: global visions of water”

The uncertainty and financial costs of COVID-19 have put a damper on traveling art exhibitions, causing some museums to focus more on exhibits from permanent collections and local loans – “Our Blue Planet” at the Seattle Art Museum is one of these exhibitions, featuring a hundred books on the theme of water. Expect a vast array of artifacts, across centuries, mediums, and the world: photographs from India in the United States, Japanese woodcuts, video works from the Philippines and the northwestern part of the country. Pacific, fluorescent light sculptures and paintings of Germany from the 19th century to the 21st century. century in Australia.

March 18-May 30; Seattle Art Museum, 1300 First Ave., Seattle; $ 19.99 to $ 29.99; 206-654-3100, seattleartmuseum.org.

– BK


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A master doll maker in the valley https://japononline.net/a-master-doll-maker-in-the-valley/ Tue, 28 Dec 2021 17:39:58 +0000 https://japononline.net/a-master-doll-maker-in-the-valley/ You can find the usual kinds of dolls — LOL Surprise! OMG Remix Lonestar, My Squishy Little Dumplings, Adora Sweet Baby Boy Peanut, etc., pretty much anywhere, but in Japan you will come across other types as well: delicate and handcrafted figurines including head, hands and the feet are made with a floor. oyster shell […]]]>

You can find the usual kinds of dolls — LOL Surprise! OMG Remix Lonestar, My Squishy Little Dumplings, Adora Sweet Baby Boy Peanut, etc., pretty much anywhere, but in Japan you will come across other types as well: delicate and handcrafted figurines including head, hands and the feet are made with a floor. oyster shell paste called enjoy; some with lavish outfits; and hina dolls with very specific designations (“An imperial servant expressing sorrow”, for example, or “A family of dolls saying a prayer for the happy marriage of their female child”). These, and the many other types of traditional Japanese dolls, are not meant to be tucked away in bed with you or dragged to the playground in your stroller. According to ancient Japanese tradition, it is believed that they have a soul, that they absorb spiritual energy, and that they are only meant to be exhibited, admired and praised. Sometimes they were even used as replacements for humans. For example, newborn babies were given abstract dolls called “heavenly twins,” in the hope that evil spirits could wonder what the real baby was and take possession of the bad one. Dolls are still so revered in Japan that they are the focus of at least one national holiday, Hinamatsuri, and when the dolls are worn out or have fallen out of favor, they are not thrown away. Downgraded dolls often receive funerals, called ningyo kuyo, in Shinto shrines and Buddhist temples. After the prayers, the dolls are gathered in a heap and burned.

Kumiko Serizawa (1928-2021), master doll maker, was born in Tokyo, during the Great Friendship Doll Exchange between the United States and Japan. This involved a program in which American children sent American blue-eyed dolls (representing the contemporary idea of ​​what an American looked like) to Japanese children, out of goodwill and peace – and to distract from recently enacted US laws against the Japanese. immigration. Japan responded by sending fifty-eight gigantic “return gesture dolls” which toured the United States.

During World War II, for security reasons, Serizawa’s parents sent her to the countryside to live with family friends. A few years after VJ Day, she got a job as a housekeeper and waitress at the Atami Hotel, an establishment in the U.S. Army R. and R., where her U.S. supervisors gave her the English name of Amy. . (Most Japanese who did business with the US military had English names; Kumiko’s fiance Soroku, who also worked at the hotel, was called Frank.) Japanese employees at the establishment were prohibited from doing so. to eat the hotel’s American food while they worked. Kumiko was charming enough to get out of trouble when she was caught sneaking a glass of milk.

In 1952, shortly after Kumiko and Soroku got married, he bought her a traditional doll at Takashimaya, a chic department store in Tokyo. She was fascinated by the doll and decided that she wanted to learn how to make one. She attended classes for two years at two different doll-making schools, practicing incorporating silk kimono fabric into the large sawdust shapes used for the bodies of the dolls. kimekomi dolls, which are usually female dolls with elaborate and simple outfits enjoy heads and hands, and how to insert eyelashes into delicate silk faces of Sakura dolls. (Later, she taught herself to make the faceless three-dimensional folded paper washi ningyo dolls.) At the end of class, she received a kanban—A wooden sign certifying his competence — and under the professional pseudonym Kookyu.

In 1958, the Serizawas, who then had a baby girl, Naomi, decided to immigrate to the United States; they traveled on a ship carrying general goods, a few nuns and several orphans. They started a house in the San Fernando Valley. Most of the families of the Japanese-American friends they quickly made had immigrated to the United States long before the war, and they viewed the Serizawas with some fascination, as the Serizawas had not grown up forcibly detained in an internment camp, as they had done, but, instead, had resisted the war in Japan. Kumiko settled in California, but she had no intention of shedding traditions. Over time, she began to use the master bedroom of her home as a doll-making classroom. She taught groups of up to ten students at a time, guiding them through the four or five month process of finishing a doll.

And, of course, she continued to make her own dolls, which were renowned for their grace and detail; the realism of her doll’s hair was often noticed. She exhibited them at the annual Japanese festival Nisei Week, a cultural celebration in little Tokyo of Los Angeles; the Obon Festival, which honors ancestors, at the Japanese-American Community Center in San Fernando Valley; and, for more than a decade, at the annual Disneyland Festival in Japan. (“Other kids would be so excited to go to Disneyland,” Kumiko’s daughter Naomi said recently. “I had been there so many times with my mom that I was totally overwhelmed.” ) Kumiko was right-handed and never managed to teach left-handed Naomi how to make dolls. But by the time Kumiko’s youngest daughter Patty, another right-hander, was a teenager, she was teaching doll-making alongside her mother.

“I grew up with a Barbie,” Naomi said recently, adding that her mother’s dressmaking friends made loads of outfits for her doll, so she thinks she had one of the best dressed Barbies around. city.

“I got the used Barbies,” Patty said. “I was the younger sister, so it was inevitable.”

What about Kumiko’s dolls? I was wondering if they had received a funeral when she passed away, but it turns out that they were divided between her husband, her daughters and her former students, where they will live again and again.


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Chip Tanaka: His Ambitious | Culture https://japononline.net/chip-tanaka-his-ambitious-culture/ Sun, 26 Dec 2021 20:52:46 +0000 https://japononline.net/chip-tanaka-his-ambitious-culture/ Even if you don’t know Hirokazu Tanaka’s name, there’s a good chance you know his music. Best known to video game fans as Chip Tanaka, he’s the guy behind some of Nintendo’s most famous soundtracks from the 80s. Tunes maker featured in nostalgic tracks like “Metroid”, “Super Mario Land “and” Tetris “, it also produced […]]]>

Even if you don’t know Hirokazu Tanaka’s name, there’s a good chance you know his music. Best known to video game fans as Chip Tanaka, he’s the guy behind some of Nintendo’s most famous soundtracks from the 80s. Tunes maker featured in nostalgic tracks like “Metroid”, “Super Mario Land “and” Tetris “, it also produced the opening theme song” Pokemon “in 1997. When it first launched, few people expected” Pokemon “to be as popular as it is today. , and the original song has now surpassed two million CD sales.

Tanaka had made a real name for himself in the late 80’s, but, never satisfied, he continued to research chiptune sounds even after leaving Nintendo. After celebrating his 50th birthday in the winter of 2007, he was thirsty for a new project to put his creative teeth into and decided to give himself a new name: Chip Tanaka. Before the coronavirus pandemic, he actively played DJ sets in some of Tokyo’s renowned venues. Thus, Tanaka is still one of the main legends of today’s Japanese music scene, releasing his third album. Domani this november.

The Italian word domani translates to “tomorrow”, a fitting name given that the album addresses ideas of permanence, impermanence, transience and dreams. The pandemic allowed the artistic legend to return to the rock albums he listened to as a youth, prompting the 64-year-old to aim higher than ever. Metropolis met the artist of living legend on this highly anticipated album.

M: You performed regularly at events and shows. How did you spend your time at home after the pandemic?

HT: Every event was an inspiration to me so I always felt I could improve my set after playing. I already had some ideas for this album at the end of 2019, even if it was shortly after the release of the previous album. But after the pandemic, I started listening to my favorite albums like The Beatles or The Rolling Stones again.

M: Do you think it helped you make this album in some way?

HT: I’m just a fan when I listen to my favorite music. During the pandemic, I spent a lot of time reading interviews and articles about these artists.. There was a lot to learn about them and their professionalism blew me away. These guys are already in their seventies but have been at the top of the music industry for over half a century. I think it’s amazing. Everything, even the small details, are carefully considered. From the color of the ties they wear to the way they appear in the media.

What fascinates us is their attitude, not the music itself. Their life is entertainment, and it has always felt more real to me than the music they create. I probably wouldn’t have achieved this without the pandemic. It’s not easy to take a break from life when you live in a society that places so much emphasis on productivity and efficiency. Still, that was definitely a positive aspect of the pandemic for me.

I recently started Pilates because I think Paul and Mick Jagger need to do exercises like Pilates [laughs]. I’m just in awe of how they are the best artists today and couldn’t help but start doing something for myself too.

M: When it comes to Tokyo, cyber / electric sounds seem to be what people are likely to associate with the city. For example, the song by British artist Squarepusher Terminal snap. You were walking through Harajuku in the Netflix documentary series “High Score”. Was there a specific reason for you to walk to Harajuku? What does Tokyo look like to you?

HT: When I make music, I sit and focus in my studio, so walking around is not inspirational for me. But I like Tokyo more than Kyoto. I was born in the rural area of ​​Kyoto, which had a lot of traditional wooden houses. Unlike the younger people who live in urban areas and yearn for this kind of life, I’ve had enough [laughs].

In my opinion, Tokyo still has a lot of primitive elements everywhere, even though the city is one of the biggest cities in the world. For example, places with the Japanese characters 谷 (valley) like Shibuya (渋 谷) ​​and Yotsuya (四 谷), were once creeks or rivers. I was amazed when I discovered that Tokyo Bay had an estuary coast.

If you link all the shrines and temples of Tokyo on the map, you can see the shape of the estuary coast from thousands of years ago. I found it very interesting. Cities like Osaka and Kyoto also have a long history but, in Tokyo in particular, you can really trace the physical history of over 10,000 years.

I used to live in Harajuku and it has been a while since I been there. I started revisiting Harajuku recently and realized that I had forgotten how much I loved the young and energetic atmosphere. I don’t think you can find places like Harajuku in western cities. I said I don’t go for a walk to write a song but maybe my walks in Harajuku subconsciously affect my writing on some level.

M: How would you like your listeners to appreciate your new album? Domani?

HT: I’m grateful if my fans are listening Domani as an album or as individual tracks. I have a lot of younger fans, and I’m aware that they listen to music on subscription platforms. But I cared about the flow of this album, so it’s possible to enjoy it anyway. The first half is pop and the second half is sweeter.

M: How much do you consider your young audience when making music?

HT: The other day, a friend of mine told me that his grandson was a fan of the “Mother” video game. I wondered why such a young boy knew such an old game. It turned out that the American game creator Toby Fox, who created the game “Undertale”, is also a fan of the same game and the grandson has discovered the game on YouTube.

I thought it was a very modern way of rediscovering things, and I felt it all told me that I didn’t have time to be happy with what I’ve accomplished so far. I must continue. However, I thought it was cool that one game influences another like music does.

M: What are your current plans for the future?

HT: Ideally, I would like to do a new song every day, as YouTubers post a new video on their YouTube channel. Even if I do a song that I don’t really like, it might be someone’s favorite song. Whether it’s a one-minute or a five-minute track, you should get it published. It’s not you who decides if it’s a good song, it’s the audience that makes it.

As long as they’re online, someone will find you someday. Making music seems to produce something completely new, but it’s actually putting in your favorite music and what influenced you in your style. I believe there is no such thing as plagiarism.

I look forward to a day when we can get together again to enjoy the music from the speakers as we did before the pandemic. I hope I can meet my fans and that they can dance to this album one day in real venues. Until then, I’ll keep making music and have to do Pilates until the day comes.

Official site

Domani

  1. GO → JUMP
  2. Peaceful
  3. Third sunrise
  4. Marvelous world
  5. Fennec
  6. Cactus song
  7. hourglass
  8. Rainy ride
  9. Moon drop
  10. Shadow dance
  11. Sandstorm
  12. Discolor
  13. Trip
  14. 1912


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Fairytale Fantasies Meet Reality on “The Future Diary” and “The Bachelor Japan” https://japononline.net/fairytale-fantasies-meet-reality-on-the-future-diary-and-the-bachelor-japan/ Sat, 25 Dec 2021 01:15:07 +0000 https://japononline.net/fairytale-fantasies-meet-reality-on-the-future-diary-and-the-bachelor-japan/ Are you looking for a love story this holiday season? Or maybe you prefer to indulge in a more complicated romantic competition? Either way, the streaming services bring you two Japanese shows that blur the line between reality and drama. Netflix’s “The Future Diary,” which premiered on December 14, aims to recreate the romance-fueled absurdity […]]]>

Are you looking for a love story this holiday season? Or maybe you prefer to indulge in a more complicated romantic competition? Either way, the streaming services bring you two Japanese shows that blur the line between reality and drama.

Netflix’s “The Future Diary,” which premiered on December 14, aims to recreate the romance-fueled absurdity of a Japanese TV drama in the real world. Two strangers get together and play out a love story guided by the titular book, which gives them instructions and incentives to move their relationship forward. The plots are ripped from the familiar tropes of Japanese TV shows, with the exception of the fairytale ending – in a truly melodramatic twist, the couple have to say goodbye to each other at the end, even though they fell in love with it. one another.

The premise is one that originally debuted as the popular centerpiece of the late 1990s variety show “Unnan no Hontoko!”

The reboot of Netflix, produced in collaboration with TBS, focuses on Maai Nakasone from Okinawa and Takuto Wakamatsu from Hokkaido. The couple get to know each other in a way that is both familiar (coffee in a cafe) and ridiculous (forced to cook dinner for a ship full of impatient people). The Future Diary itself directs them, telling them things like when to have their first kiss.

Between the segments, a panel of four Japanese celebrities – singer Daigo Naito, Exile member Taiki Sato, TV personality Saya and Tokyo TV presenter Reina Sumi – offer an analysis of what they see. This is a format familiar to Asian audiences, but only recognizable to fans of the “Terrace House” show elsewhere. The commentators on this show were one of the best parts of the viewing experience, but on “The Future Diary,” at least for the first three episodes, their contributions are somewhat unnecessary.

Although he knows how it all ends – the very first scene from the first episode shows Maai and Takuto tearfully accepting that they have to say goodbye to each other – “The Future Diary” is fun because it focuses on the journey. romantic rather than bittersweet result, and it offers great viewing comfort. The real world might not look like a romantic comedy, but Netflix can at least make it possible for 30-minute bursts.

Amazon Prime’s “The Bachelor Japan,” which premiered on November 25, ignores Japanese drama lore in favor of the current American approach of turning everything into a contest. The show, now in its fourth season, follows the same beats as the US version of the reality show competition with women from all over Japan vying for a man’s affection, this time a quadrilingual Chinese businessman. named Kou Kou, participating in various competitions to get his attention. Similar to “The Future Diary,” a panel offers commentary between the action, although the “Bachelor” crew – singer Rino Sashihara and comedians Koji Imada and Shingo Fujimori – are much funnier than the low-key cast. ” The Future Diary “reunited.

The tone of the series differs drastically – “The Future Diary” aims to recreate drama while “The Bachelor Japan” simply revel in it – but the two don’t seem to be kidding each other when it comes to providing entertainment. Although centered around real people in the real world, the lovebirds of “The Future Diary” essentially improvise on a loose script, while “The Bachelor Japan” features fantastic storylines set against a tropical backdrop of Thailand – when Was the last time you had to play rhythmic gymnastics to get a second date?

We all just want a little love, even though you can see the strings of the entertainment industry holding it together.

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